Paris 09.26.2017, 17h37   CRF  17.09 €  +3.45%

Tackling deforestation resulting from soya crops

BELOW

Plant proteins (including soya) are used in animal feeds for livestock rearing. With little production currently in Europe, soya is frequently imported from Brazil, where it is one of the causes of deforestation.

Carrefour is committed to tackling deforestation resulting from soya crops and supports non-GMO soya crops.In order to analyse the deforestation risks in its supply chains, Carrefour geographically traces soya, as well as using the Pro terra standard for its Carrefour Quality Lines fed on GMO-free feeds and sold in France. The Pro Terra standard certifies the producers and suppliers of non-genetically modified soya, guaranteeing that no deforestation occurred.

Elsewhere, Carrefour is helping to develop deforestation-free supply lines. The Group is a member of the Roundtable on Responsible Soy (RTRS). This international organisation is made up of soya producers, industry representatives, mass retailers and NGOs.

Since 2006, Carrefour has supported the soya moratorium in Amazonia. This initiative, developed by professionals in the sector in coordination with Brazilian authorities and civil society, is being deployed in a bid to help fight deforestation in the Amazon rainforest. The moratorium has been renewed every year for the past 10 years, and was implemented for an indefinite period of time in 2016.

Notably, in France, Carrefour and the Avril Group have entered into an agreement to develop French plant proteins as an alternative to imported soya. Starting in 2017, all poultry, trout and duck – as well as some of the pork produce that Carrefour France sells – will need to be reared on local plant protein-based feeds.

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